Tag Archives: conference

Upcoming speaking gigs

Fresh from a quick presentation and supporting Hackference this past weekend (more on that soon), I’ve turned my attention to the next couple of months of travel and events. There’s a lot of stuff happening!

Firstly, to my enormous regret I have to miss the Brighton Mini Maker Faire this coming weekend – if you are in the UK then it is a great day out, and I encourage you to go along, with or without a young family in tow.  I wrote about attending the first one in 2011, and helped as a volunteer last year. I’m sure it is going to be fabulous!

platform

Instead of being in the UK, this coming weekend I’m headed to Santa Clara for Platform: the Cloud Foundry Conference – our first developer summit for the whole Cloud Foundry community. On the back of partnership announcements with companies like IBM, Savvis and Piston, this is looking extremely exciting. I don’t have a formal speaking slot, but I’m going to be heavily involved and have helped with the planning and scheduling. I’m hoping to get a couple of topics onto the agenda for the unconference slot on the Monday afternoon, too!

Follow along via the Twitter hashtag #platformcf

SpringOne2GX

Immediately after Platform is the annual SpringOne 2GX event. There has been a huge amount of activity in the Spring community over the past couple of months and I think it is safe to say that this year there is some major excitement around where Spring has been headed. I’ve been privileged to spend some time with folks like Adrian Colyer recently, and I know the entire team has been working hard on many projects, so expect some very interesting news about the evolution of Spring and its capabilities. I’m speaking on the Cloud Foundry track, on the first morning of the conference, with my good friend (and Spring Developer Advocate) Josh Long, covering the topic “Build your Spring Applications on Cloud Foundry”.

The Twitter hashtags are #s2gx or #springone2gx

Later on the same day I’ll be zipping up to San Francisco to participate in a panel discussion at CloudBeat 2013, alongside my friend Diane Mueller and others. The panel topic is “Is PaaS Still Coming?” and we’re on at 1.50 in the afternoon slot. If you are interested in coming along, full event details can be found here, and you can save 20% on a ticket (there is a bunch of great content throughout the event, so if you are in the Bay Area it looks worthwhile). Hashtag for this one is #cloudbeat2013.

[pause for breath… and relax]

structure-europe_media-badge_see-me-speak

The following week I’m enormously honoured to have been invited to a panel at GigaOM Structure Europe, at home here in London.  The topic of this one is “DevOps: Is Synchronicity Here?” and rounds out day 2 of the event by taking a look at the current state of DevOps. This link should save you 25% on a ticket and I’d be delighted to see you there.

Next up, the speaking circuit takes me to Aarhus in Denmark, which is exciting as I’ve only ever visited Copenhagen before. I’ll be at GOTO Aarhus 2013, speaking on Cloud Foundry and why it is a great platform for running Java apps in the cloud.

Later in October I have a trip to Singapore, to talk to Pivotal customers about the products, projects and technologies we are developing, at our first Asia Pacific Pivotal Summit.

Finally – last but by no means least – to finish off October, I have two talks on the slate at JAX London 2013: “Run your Java code on Cloud Foundry” and (with my non-Pivotal, Open Source Community hat on) “Eclipse Paho and MQTT – Java messaging in the Internet of Things“. Both of these are on October 30th in London. If you want to get a ticket to come along to JAX London (it looks jam-packed with great content) then the promo code JL13AP should get you a 15% discount on the ticket price.

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My first VMworld

I’m very excited to be here with my colleagues and our customers and partners at the annual VMworld conference, this year held in San Francisco (conveniently close to our HQ and also the location where my fellow Cloud Foundry Developer Advocates are based).

I’m primarily here to talk with folks about Cloud Foundry, of course – I’ll spend some time on the Solutions Center floor today doing so. Another important reason that I wanted to be here, as a new employee of just under five months, was to soak up the broader story around the VMware story and portfolio – there’s some very cool stuff happening around cloud, virtualisation, and end user computing and I’m excited to hear what gets announced during the keynotes this week.

If you are attending, do try to get along to the Cloud Foundry Bootcamp session (Monday pm), or some of the other Cloud Foundry and BOSH sessions that are on the agenda – I was really pleased to have met folks like Brian McClain already and to have reconnected with friends like Dave McCrory and the legendary Josh Long who are involved with some of these sessions.

First impressions? big, lots of energy. Exciting. Love the range of chillout activities (foosball, air hockey, video game cabinets, board games and LEGO!) in the Hang Space. Love the social aspects with a giant 360 degree LED display showing tweets, photos etc, and a Socialcast site setup for the attendees to network. There’s a lot to explore in the Solutions Center. It is going to be a busy week! Do come and introduce yourself and say hi if you’re here… always delighted to meet new folks… and of course I’m tweeting like crazy about the event and announcements as well, so feel free to follow me online to learn more.

 

TransferSummit 2011

One of the benefits of having attended OggCamp a few weeks ago was that I became aware of another event. Steve Lee, one of the speakers at OggCamp, is also involved with TransferSummit, and he was good enough to point it out to me. I’m grateful that he did.

TransferSummit bills itself as

… a forum for business executives and members of the academic and research community to discuss requirements, challenges, and opportunities in the use, development, licensing, and future innovation in Open Source technology.

Unlike a *Camp event, this wasn’t a self-organising unconference, and was much more business-focused. The sense I had was that it was far more about “getting down to work” than the more fun Open Source-oriented events that I otherwise attend. There were a range of fantastic speakers, and with my good friend James Governor giving the opening keynote it really didn’t take me long to decide that it was something that I should get to.

Not only that, but the event was held at my alma mater Oxford, in the rather lovely surroundings of Keble College – which I don’t remember ever having visited whilst I was at university – it was red brick, comparatively far up Parks Road away from my college, in the “science area”, and as a History student I simply never had much occasion to go up there! Have to say that I was very impressed by the college, accommodation, and service from students and staff. Fantastic.

You can explore more of my TransferSummit 2011 photos on Picasa.

I really enjoyed a number of elements of TransferSummit. Firstly, whilst there were a few folks I knew from my other networks, it was largely a group of people I’d not come across before directly, so it was a great opportunity to meet some new people in this space. It wasn’t too much of an echo chamber, and as Ross Gardler said during his introduction, it wasn’t a crowd of folks who already “get it” in terms of Open Source usage and adoption – there were a fair few organisations on the edge of making choices and I felt that the talks were more about how to go about making sensible ones, putting the right governance practices in place, and learning from the successes and mistakes of others.

I couldn’t cover all three tracks of the agenda in detail, but I’ll highlight a few particularly interesting sessions I did listen to (again, there’s more complete coverage on Lanyrd):

Another nice element of the event was the “gadget playtime” Open Source (and not-so-open) Hardware area, where I spent a lot of time talking to the folks from OSHUG and other projects.

One of the things that was negatively commented on via Twitter and other discussions was that Microsoft was the Platinum sponsor of the event. I found that very interesting, particularly where the commenters weren’t present at TransferSummit itself. To reassure those who may have stayed away or otherwise expressed concerns, I’ll just say that there was very definitely no “Microsoft agenda” being pushed, that my friend Steve Lamb was there very much in “listen, learn and interact” mode, but that others who attended and who I greatly respect did express other views about some elements of their participation (and I imagine it’s not hard to track those opinions down via hashtags etc.). Either way, having been involved with various conferences now, I fully support the idea that having a wide range of sponsors willing to help fund a professional conference and make is successful is important, so I thank Microsoft, HP and all of the sponsors (and in particular to the folks from OpenDirective) for enabling it to happen.

Definitely a worthwhile way to spend a couple of days of time – a well-run, informative event with great experiences shared, and some good contacts that I look forward to maintaining. My tip: look out for similar events and make an effort to mingle with the business, academic and government communities on Open Source. You might just learn something.

Disclosure: I was (unexpectedly) generously comp’d a ticket enabling me to attend, thanks to the organisers. My employer had no involvement and I attended on my own time.

Gallery

Photo post: IBM IMPACT 2011

I didn’t have a “proper” camera with me at IMPACT this year, but I did snap a bunch of images using my iPhone – they were either tweeted via yfrog, or through Instagram. Don’t expect the most awesome photography, but … Continue reading

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Lightweight Messaging and Linux #lca2011

I’ve just delivered my talk at LinuxConf Australia 2011Lightweight Messaging for a Connected Planet. Unlike any of the other “spins” of the MQTT overview talk I’ve delivered before, this one really talks in more detail about the coding side, with shout outs to many of the members of the MQTT community and their projects. Special mentions here to Roger Light and the mosquitto project, and Nick O’Leary and the Arduino client. There has been a huge amount of discussion of Arduino and home automation (and sending Tux to the edge of space with an Arduino on a balloon… unrelated to MQTT but awesome) at LCA 2011 so these aspects turned out to fit really well.

Do let me know if you start to play around with MQTT as I believe there are some really funky things happening (some of which are highlighted in the slides). I’ve had some particularly great conversations with Andy Gelme who helped to run the Arduino Miniconf at LCA2011 and I hope to see things moving forward on his open hardware router project, too.