Tag Archives: conference

First impressions of LinuxConf Australia #lca2011

Beautiful morning at #lca2011

Well now. Here I am on my first visit to Australia, primarily in order to speak this week at LinuxConf Australia 2011 (a session on Lightweight Messaging for smarter devices on Friday, for those interested).

Given the serious disruption to Brisbane over the past two weeks, the organisers have done a superb job of re-jigging the entire event: changing venues, sorting out accommodation, reorganising the transport plans, catering, etc etc. Stunning. Although we may not be in the location that was originally intended, I’m really impressed by the way things have come together, so a huge thanks to the whole team.

Brisbane

After a lengthy flight and visiting some different parts of Brisbane with some family in the area on Sunday, I hit the conference proper on Sunday evening with registration followed by a talk for newbies by Rusty Russell. Useful advice: “don’t be a fanboy”…. tricky when you’re a techie Linux geek at a conference with Ted T’so, Linus Torvalds, Jeff Waugh and too many others to mention… but, I’m doing my best 🙂

Some brief early impressions:

  • there is simply too much to do / see / hear! I spent all of day one at the Arduino miniconf, which was great… although I’ve played around with Arduinos before, I’d never built one from scratch. It worked!
  • Brisbane is a lovely city. The weather has been just about OK for me so far, although when I left the UK on Friday it was 0C and now it’s in the high 20s! The flood water has receded and the clearup is ongoing but the city is getting on with things.
  • there has been great wifi coverage… by far the best I’ve ever encountered at a conference. Spread between the conference venues, the accommodation (several km away), and enough for many geeks with multiple wireless devices! Why can’t every conference manage this?
  • are a lot of photos hitting Flickr…. the only thing that frustrates me is that most are not open for tagging / people tagging. Please open your pictures, particularly those from events, for tagging.
  • I’m also hoping that more people will start to use Lanyrd for aggregating write-ups, slides, photos etc.

Follow more from the conference via Twitter, check out my photos… a live stream of some of the sessions should arrive soon.

Advertisements

My talk from CRIM Crystal Ball 2010 – video

Following my talk in Montreal a couple of weeks ago, my hosts from CRIM have been kind enough to provide me with the video and have also given me permission to share it online. They’ve also posted a short photo report on Flickr.

See the High Def / full quality version on Vimeo

Also available (lower quality) on Viddler

Enterprise Convergence: CRIM Crystal Ball 2010

Today I had the privilege of joining a number of distinguished speakers on the slate at the CRIM Crystal Ball Conference, 2010, in Montreal, Quebec.

My topic was what I chose to term Enterprise Convergence: or, how consumer technology is changing the way we work. The pendulum has swung the other way from the past – previously, email was used in academia and by corporations before it gained mass adoption; now, mass adoption of social networks, virtual worlds / 3D Internet and always-on and pervasive connectivity are driving the ways in which enterprises have to adapt their models of operation internally.

My slides are on Slideshare (and I created a SlideShare event to collect others). I’ll try to add some commentary shortly, because they are largely images and may not make a huge amount of sense without the words to back them up!

As usual I get excited and animated and could have gone off in all kinds of directions when asked to speak on a topic like this – I envied a few of the other presenters and could have jumped in to add to some of their commentaries, too! A few references and reading suggestions if you are interested in learning more around the subjects I was covering:

  • Everyware by Adam Greenfield. One lady asked me afterwards whether this book is still worth reading as it was published in 2006. Absolutely. It’s a great read. Actually I reviewed it here on my blog back in 2007.
  • Convergence Culture by Henry Jenkins. This is interesting in terms of media convergence and the blurring of the lines between different types of media and connections. Not an essential read, but it’s where I got inspiration for my title!
  • The Future of Management by Gary Hamel. At least one other speaker mentioned this at CRIM 2010 and it’s really a great read, thinking about trusting employees and daring to be different in management and business models.
  • Grown Up Digital by Don Tapscott. I lose count of the number of times I’ve recommended this. Read it. It’s awesome and will likely change the way that you think of the generation entering business in the next few years. Trust them. Innovate with them.
  • Here Comes Everybody by Clay Shirky. Everything is social, live with it, use it, embrace it.
  • Andy Stanford-Clark’s infamous Twittering automated home
  • If you want to keep up with trends in technology like those I outlined in the talk, you might want to subscribe to the weekly podcast that I co-host, Dogear Nation
  • IBM Social Computing Guidelines – publically available to read and review, and there’s a nice video too.
  • INNOV8 Game – IBM’s Business Process Management simulation game
  • IBM Lotus Connections – a modular social software platform for the enterprise
  • IBM Sametime 3D – virtual collaboration
  • IBM WebSphere Cloudburst – provision private cloud servers
  • Unity3D and Layar
  • David Helgason from Unity on Gamification and 2010 trends

Finally, you can find photos from my first trip to Quebec here and photos from the event in the event photoset on Flickr.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

Poken are growing up?

Poken Me! It seems like just a few short months ago that I discovered Poken – neat little USB keychain devices which you can touch together when you meet someone else with one, in order to electronically exchange social network IDs and contact information. Actually… it was only a few months ago – we talked about them on Dogear Nation episode 88 in February, and in an example of serendipitous discovery, I picked one up a week later at Twestival in London. I immediately thought the idea was cool, but I was disappointed to discover how much they cost, and how few people had them.

I mentioned Poken in my presentation at SOMESSO a couple of weeks ago. Whilst I love the idea, I simply haven’t come across enough people who have a Poken to have made it worth my while. My basic comment at the time was that I felt they needed to make themselves more widespread in order to be useful. Since then, I’ve continued the discussion in comments on a couple of blogs. To quote myself:

However, I think there are a few issues…

  • [they] cost more than most people are prepared to pay for what is essentially a small capacity but cute looking memory stick, and they are not very readily available;
  • the cuteness factor can also be off-putting to some people, particularly those with a business purpose in mind and the disposable income to buy them;
  • too few core connectors and salesmen have them (see Gladwell’s The Tipping Point), IMHO they should seed more;
  • the value-add of the site (which actually manages the contacts) is low, so the business model is presumably centred on selling the devices.

I had yet another conversation about Poken at a tweetup in London last week, and again heard comment that they were too toy-like for business users, and too few people had them.

Well – things appear to be changing. For want of a better phrase, it seems as though Poken are going slightly more corporate.

In particular, I was delighted to discover that they are being used in a much broader context at IBM’s Information on Demand conference this year – shedding the cute image, and hopefully becoming a bit more widespread.

This is all great stuff. I engaged with the idea of Poken as soon as I heard about the concept, and I hope that I’ll be able to share and manage my information more easily in future. Maybe Poken won’t be the answer, but I’m glad to see the idea broadening out, and hopefully reaching a wider audience.

Double vision – videos from SOMESSO

You wait three weeks for a video, and then two turn up at once. No wait… that was buses.

The video of my talk from SOMESSO London 2009 has been made available. Unfortunately I’m not able to embed that here on my site, so follow the link if you want to see it. It’s about 20 minutes long.

You can also watch an interview I gave towards the end of the day.

You’ll sleep better tonight 🙂