Tag Archives: events

On joining Twitter

#lifeattwitter

I’ve been settling into my new role at Twitter over the past few months. I’m a Developer Advocate on the Developer and Platform Relations team, based out of a beautiful new London office we opened a few weeks ago.

It has been fantastic so far, learning about the Twitter platform and starting to work with partners and developers trying out the API. I’ve been a small part of a couple of feature launches which I’m incredibly proud to have helped with. We’ve run our first Twitter UK community Friday4Good which I helped to plan. As well as that, I’ve spoken about the Twitter API in the context of the Internet of Things at both Techsylvania in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, and more recently at GOTO in Amsterdam.

In a recent post over on the Twitter Developer blog I’ve written a little bit more about why I was excited to join this amazing team.

Developers embraced Twitter early on, seeing it as an open platform that could enrich apps with contextual information and provide access to public conversations, sentiments and signals. Twitter enabled developers to create cool, new and fun experiences that were never before possible.

Oh, and if you want to follow what we are up to as a team, you should keep an eye on the @TwitterDev and @TwitterAPI handles, as well as @TwitterUK for more UK-centric news!

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Upcoming speaking gigs

Fresh from a quick presentation and supporting Hackference this past weekend (more on that soon), I’ve turned my attention to the next couple of months of travel and events. There’s a lot of stuff happening!

Firstly, to my enormous regret I have to miss the Brighton Mini Maker Faire this coming weekend – if you are in the UK then it is a great day out, and I encourage you to go along, with or without a young family in tow.  I wrote about attending the first one in 2011, and helped as a volunteer last year. I’m sure it is going to be fabulous!

platform

Instead of being in the UK, this coming weekend I’m headed to Santa Clara for Platform: the Cloud Foundry Conference – our first developer summit for the whole Cloud Foundry community. On the back of partnership announcements with companies like IBM, Savvis and Piston, this is looking extremely exciting. I don’t have a formal speaking slot, but I’m going to be heavily involved and have helped with the planning and scheduling. I’m hoping to get a couple of topics onto the agenda for the unconference slot on the Monday afternoon, too!

Follow along via the Twitter hashtag #platformcf

SpringOne2GX

Immediately after Platform is the annual SpringOne 2GX event. There has been a huge amount of activity in the Spring community over the past couple of months and I think it is safe to say that this year there is some major excitement around where Spring has been headed. I’ve been privileged to spend some time with folks like Adrian Colyer recently, and I know the entire team has been working hard on many projects, so expect some very interesting news about the evolution of Spring and its capabilities. I’m speaking on the Cloud Foundry track, on the first morning of the conference, with my good friend (and Spring Developer Advocate) Josh Long, covering the topic “Build your Spring Applications on Cloud Foundry”.

The Twitter hashtags are #s2gx or #springone2gx

Later on the same day I’ll be zipping up to San Francisco to participate in a panel discussion at CloudBeat 2013, alongside my friend Diane Mueller and others. The panel topic is “Is PaaS Still Coming?” and we’re on at 1.50 in the afternoon slot. If you are interested in coming along, full event details can be found here, and you can save 20% on a ticket (there is a bunch of great content throughout the event, so if you are in the Bay Area it looks worthwhile). Hashtag for this one is #cloudbeat2013.

[pause for breath… and relax]

structure-europe_media-badge_see-me-speak

The following week I’m enormously honoured to have been invited to a panel at GigaOM Structure Europe, at home here in London.  The topic of this one is “DevOps: Is Synchronicity Here?” and rounds out day 2 of the event by taking a look at the current state of DevOps. This link should save you 25% on a ticket and I’d be delighted to see you there.

Next up, the speaking circuit takes me to Aarhus in Denmark, which is exciting as I’ve only ever visited Copenhagen before. I’ll be at GOTO Aarhus 2013, speaking on Cloud Foundry and why it is a great platform for running Java apps in the cloud.

Later in October I have a trip to Singapore, to talk to Pivotal customers about the products, projects and technologies we are developing, at our first Asia Pacific Pivotal Summit.

Finally – last but by no means least – to finish off October, I have two talks on the slate at JAX London 2013: “Run your Java code on Cloud Foundry” and (with my non-Pivotal, Open Source Community hat on) “Eclipse Paho and MQTT – Java messaging in the Internet of Things“. Both of these are on October 30th in London. If you want to get a ticket to come along to JAX London (it looks jam-packed with great content) then the promo code JL13AP should get you a 15% discount on the ticket price.

My first VMworld

I’m very excited to be here with my colleagues and our customers and partners at the annual VMworld conference, this year held in San Francisco (conveniently close to our HQ and also the location where my fellow Cloud Foundry Developer Advocates are based).

I’m primarily here to talk with folks about Cloud Foundry, of course – I’ll spend some time on the Solutions Center floor today doing so. Another important reason that I wanted to be here, as a new employee of just under five months, was to soak up the broader story around the VMware story and portfolio – there’s some very cool stuff happening around cloud, virtualisation, and end user computing and I’m excited to hear what gets announced during the keynotes this week.

If you are attending, do try to get along to the Cloud Foundry Bootcamp session (Monday pm), or some of the other Cloud Foundry and BOSH sessions that are on the agenda – I was really pleased to have met folks like Brian McClain already and to have reconnected with friends like Dave McCrory and the legendary Josh Long who are involved with some of these sessions.

First impressions? big, lots of energy. Exciting. Love the range of chillout activities (foosball, air hockey, video game cabinets, board games and LEGO!) in the Hang Space. Love the social aspects with a giant 360 degree LED display showing tweets, photos etc, and a Socialcast site setup for the attendees to network. There’s a lot to explore in the Solutions Center. It is going to be a busy week! Do come and introduce yourself and say hi if you’re here… always delighted to meet new folks… and of course I’m tweeting like crazy about the event and announcements as well, so feel free to follow me online to learn more.

 

Geekery in 8-bits and more

In which I get misty-eyed and nostalgic, geek out over electronics, and think about mobile and the cloud.

Then

On Saturday I went along to the Horizons 30th anniversary of the ZX Spectrum event, organised by Paul Squires and Leila Johnston and held at the BFI in London. The event ran on both days but I wasn’t able to stay on the Sunday, so I missed at least half of the fun!

Steven Goodwin reads Sinclair User

Although I’m full of nostalgia for the 8-bit era, I have to confess I never actually owned a Speccy or any Sinclair hardware. My friends did, but I was primarily an Acorn enthusiast and our first home computer was an Electron (although the first computer I used at primary school was a Commodore PET).

I fondly remember some of the hacks I did on/with/to the Electron, including soldering a pair of headphones into the motherboard to avoid annoying my parents with the music from various Superior Software titles 🙂

Regardless of “allegiance”, Horizons was a really great day. Highlights for me included a fantastic history of computing by PJ Evans from The National Museum of Computing at Bletchley Park (if you haven’t been there yet, you should visit!); Spectranet, an Ethernet adapter for the Spectrum which had me wanting one for no good excuse that I can come up with; and the mind-blowing live composition of a chip tune by Matt Westcott which I saw, but I struggled to comprehend. Matt’s ability to reverse engineer a tune in his head was remarkable.

Oh, and if you haven’t downloaded or bought MJ Hibbett‘s Hey Hey 16k yet, or at least streamed it, you really should.

aside: since Horizons was part of SciFi London, I tried to get Micro Men director Saul Metzstein to drop some hints about his upcoming S7 Dr Who episodes. All he would say was that the western episodes were filmed in Spain (knew that), and that the script for the Christmas episode hasn’t been written yet (didn’t know that).

Now

Components

After the event on Saturday evening, I found it a real struggle to avoid crazy, nostalgia-fuelled eBay purchases, but I did manage to resist! Instead, I resolved to finally get around to building the Fignition I’d picked up at the Hack to the Future event a couple of months ago.

For those who are not familiar with it, the Fignition is a credit card sized build-it-yourself 8-bit computer based around the ATMega chip (the same one used in the Arduino and Nanode Open Source hardware boards). It’s really a remarkable little device – I guess it took me about an hour to assemble and solder, although your mileage may vary. The build guide is excellent and very clear. After performing a couple of power on tests with and without the ICs inserted, it was time to connect up to the TV – and it worked first time. It boots into a simplified Forth environment, which was reminiscent of that BBC BASIC> prompt I am so familiar with from my childhood. The only real downside is that the keyboard – built from 8 clicker buttons – is a bit fiddly to get to grips with, but hey – I just assembled a complete 8-bit computer including video out and keyboard! It’s hard not to be excited.

The board I built was a RevD – the new RevE board has onboard audio in/out (get ready for some fun loading stuff from audio cassettes, again!), and is also slightly modified so that in principle, it is possible to add Arduino-footprint shields. That’s kind of cool, as it means that it might be possible to add a PS/2 keyboard or a network interface.

Ready to test!

What’s “the point” of something so simple, by today’s standards? Well, actually – the simplicity. I went from a bag of components, to a fully working computer in the palm of my hand – no surface-mount components – to a programmable device. It’s “primitive” by the standards of today’s machines, but it’s not that hard to understand how an 8-bit “brain” works, in comparison to the 32 or 64-bit mulitcore CPUs and GPUs in modern laptops and mobile phones. In my opinion, the Fignition, Arduino and Nanode fulfil an important role in helping youngsters to understand the basic principles of electronics and computing.

Next

Last night I headed along to the fantastic Mozilla offices in London.

Mozilla Space, London

The main LJC event was Simon Maple from IBM showing off the new WebSphere 8.5 Liberty Profile running on a Raspberry Pi. I’d hooked Simon up with Sukkin Pang recently so that he could get one of the smart enclosures he provides for the Pi. It was pretty cool to see a full Java app server running on such a small computer – actually almost exactly the same size as the Fignition, only considerably more powerful of course.

The whole talk was live streamed on Mozilla Air – but if you missed it, there’s a video available (complete with semi-professional heckling from yours truly!)

Boot 2 Gecko

What stole the evening for me, though, was two other glimpses of what lies ahead. First, Tom Banks from IBM Hursley came on stage after Simon and showed off the Liberty profile running on a mobile phone. Let me clarify – he was running Android 2.3 on a Nexus One (an “old” phone), running Ubuntu Linux as a virtual image inside of that, and WebSphere inside of that. Kind of mind-blowing! A proof-of-concept and arguably not very useful… not sure when I would want to put a full JEE app server in a phone… but extremely cool. Finally, @cyberdees let Tom and I have a play with Boot to Gecko – Mozilla’s new mobile play. B2G was something I’d heard about, but not touched. I have to say that even in an early form, it’s looking very slick, boots extremely fast – much more quickly than any Android or iOS device I’ve seen – and the device integration (GPS, camera, access to hardware settings, etc) was impressive.

With the Open Web as the platform, ubiquitous mobile devices, and increasingly sophisticated cloud-based backends to interact with, the future is looking pretty cool.

Interview with Uhuru, and more events in the pipeline

As my new role continues, a podcast I recorded with Michael Surkan over at Uhuru Software has just gone online. Uhuru provide hosting based on the Cloud Foundry platform, and add first-class support for .NET applications. They also have some really neat add-ons for MMC and Visual Studio to make deployment easy. We talked a little about the role of a Developer Advocate, the groups I’ve been talking to about adoption of Cloud Foundry, and some of the “gotchas” to consider when taking an application to a Platform-as-a-Service environment.

(if you can hear any background noise on this one, it was because I was at the Scala Days event in London on the day we spoke, and not Michael’s fault at all! I don’t think it sounds too bad)

Coming up this week, there’s the big Cloud Foundry Open Tour London on Tuesday (based on the numbers I’m hearing about, it sounds like that is going to be busy). Many of us from the engineering and developer relations teams will be speaking at that one. The rest of the week, I’ll be at SourceDevCon in London where my head honcho Patrick will be speaking on Thursday afternoon.

To round the week off, there’s Horizons at the BFI on Saturday and Sunday, to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the ZX Spectrum. I was always more of an Acorn guy myself, but there’s no denying these classic machines really kickstarted my interest in this role space – and I can’t wait to hear MJ Hibbett perform “Hey Hey 16k” in person! 🙂