Tag Archives: tagging

Veronica Belmont on Dogear Nation

Image courtesy of Veronica Belmont under a CC license

Rounding off a very cool week which started with Blue Fusion and would otherwise have ended with TVSMC, on Friday’s edition of Dogear Nation we were very lucky to have Veronica Belmont as our special guest.

For those not familiar with Veronica, I first became aware of her when she was hosting the Maholo Daily podcast. She has since gone on to present Tekzilla on Revision 3 and Qore on the PlayStation Network. Bottom line? She knows her tech (just check out some of the stuff she’s done!) and was a great guest. She was also patient enough to bear with us and get over a, um, technical hitch, which meant that the show runs a little shorter than usual – ask Michael what I’m talking about! 🙂

So it was a great show, well worth checking out. If you’re not doing it already, why not tag some of the sites you come across this week with ‘dogear-nation’ on del.icio.us? I’m having a couple of weeks off, so the Michaels will need something to talk about!

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Co-hosting Dogear Nation in 2009

In the past, I’ve posted a blog entry here whenever I’ve been a guest on the Dogear Nation podcast.

Well, not any more. That’s because this year, I’m one of the regular co-hosts of the podcast, and we’d only end up with a weekly entry over here as well as on the Dogear Nation blog and the show itself in iTunes.

Dogear Nation is a listener-driven podcast, so we’d love to have you on board with us. Throughout the week, listeners mark their latest discoveries and news stories on the web with the tag “dogear-nation” on social bookmarking sites like del.icio.us. We record the show each Friday, picking out your best news stories from around the web. The content is varied – we have a “technology and innovation” slant, but cover all kinds of topics. Our regular segments are “the obligatory 3D Internet section” and “Mac-a-rooni” but we also talk about coffee, gaming, the environment, social software, books, gadgets, iPhones and mobile devices, hardware hacking, and just whatever is hot in the week the show is recorded. Ultimately though, it’s about what our listeners tag for us to talk about, so the content changes dynamically from week to week. If you do tag something which we choose for the show, we’ll be sure to give you a shout-out.

Each episode is usually about 30-45 minutes (perfect for a commute!) and we have a lot of fun recording it 🙂 If you haven’t tried us before, it would be great if you dipped in to check it out, and let us know what you think.

Dogear Nation #71 – partially Pipr…

dogear-very-smallBy the time you read this you should be able to get hold of Dogear Nation episode 71 (in theory… I won’t be online to check when this post appears on the blog).

In case you are wondering what Dogear Nation is… it’s a podcast, run by my good friends Michael Martine and Michael Rowe. Listeners mark their latest discoveries and news stories on the web with the tag “dogear-nation” on social bookmarking sites like del.icio.us. At the end of the week, the Michaels take a run through the interesting news from around the web. The show is fairly varied – we have a “technology and innovation” slant, but cover all kinds of topics: the 3D Internet and virtual worlds, coffee, gaming, social software, books, libraries and Kindle e-readers, Macs and PCs, iPhones and mobile devices, hardware hacking, and just whatever is hot in the week the show is recorded. Ultimately though, it’s about what the listeners tag for us to talk about, so the content changes dynamically from week to week. If you haven’t tried it before, take a listen – the show is usually about 30-45 minutes and we have a lot of run recording it. Hopefully you’ll enjoy listening!

If you’re wondering about the name of the show – inside IBM we have a social bookmarking service called Dogear, and the guys started out running the show inside the firewall. They’ve migrated to the outside, but the name has stuck 🙂

I’ve been an occasional guest so far, and I’ve also been getting increasingly involved in the running of the website recently, rediscovering forgotten web management skills and learning a whole set of new ones around the wonderful world of podcasting!

On Friday night I joined the Michaels about halfway through the recording, and we had a little audio issue where I couldn’t hear everything so in a couple of places I lost track of the conversation… but it was awesome to be able to call in and chat about the latest tags. I always have a blast when I get to join in.

I’m looking forward to being back on the show in a week or so to talk about the news from next week’s Web 2.0 Expo.

By the way, you can also follow the team on Twitter, if you’re so inclined.

Dogear Nation guest spot

I was able to join the two Michaels (Rowe and Martine) on Friday’s recording of Dogear Nation[1]… Matt Simpson was unfortunately absent, but we still had a good talk around a bunch of topics including last week’s Technical Leadership Exchange, Twitter, social networks for conferences, file sharing, Congressional hearings on Second Life, and Guitar Hero. I think this was the third time I’ve been on the show and it’s always a pleasure. I blame my memory dropouts and umming and erring on latent jet-lag, though.

Check out the new Dogear Nation website and grab the episode direct, or do what I do and subscribe in iTunes!

[1] a weekly technology and innovation podcast, bringing you your dose of cutting-edge tagged websites 🙂

Flickr tagging – it’s not bad, it’s cool

I’m gradually working my way through the ~5000 photos from HackDay in London on Flickr, to see if there’s anything interesting that I’d missed. So far I’ve found a number of pictures of our team’s hack on stage, the planning process, the blueprint, the team hacking… all stuff that I failed to get a decent photo of.

The slightly irritating part is that people don’t always have their photos opened up for general tagging and notes. Where I can, I add tags to list the people I know in the photo, and even add a note to mark them out. Unfortunately, this setting is not the default on Flickr – the standard is to allow only your contacts to add tags. I also just found that many of my own photos were not marked as open for tags and notes.

Stephanie Booth recently wrote about this on her blog, and included a tutorial on how to change the setting.

I decided to try, and it works. And you do retain control in case somebody does something stupid (happened to me… maybe once?)

So, I’ve opened up my HackDay photos for general tagging and I’m going to go back and change the setting on other sets too.

Update 23rd March 2011: here I am four years later and I still get frustrated when people don’t let me add tags, notes, and in particular, people to images! Since I wrote this post, Flickr has introduced a lovely feature (like Facebook, Picasa and other services) that lets me tag myself or others in photos, and then builds a dynamic collection of all the photos I appear in. It’s not a default setting, and I think you also have to go back and re-enable it on photos that you uploaded before changing your settings, so it’s a bit of a pain to set up, but it’s so useful. Please let the crowds build a better folksonomy for web content.

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